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The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is the independent statutory authority that regulates Victoria's gambling and liquor industries.

Our vision is that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.
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Standard producer licence obligations

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If you hold a producer's licence, there are rules and obligations for you to understand and abide by.

Understanding your liquor licence

It's important that you read and understand your liquor licence. As well as your general obligations, you will have special conditions listed on your licence that are specific to your venue and type of licence. 

Fines, demerit points or licence suspension may apply for non-compliance with your licence conditions.  

For an overview of what is included on your licence, see: Understanding your liquor licence information sheet.

Required signage

The following notices must be on display in your venue:

  • your current licence 
  • liquor signage - Intoxicated? Drunk? Disorderly? and Under 18? No Supply - to download signs, see: Producer licence signage pack

There is a variety of optional signage that you can display in your venue to help venue staff and patrons be safe and practice the responsible service of alcohol while they are on your licensed premises. See: print my liquor signage

Impact on surrounding area

Your premises must not negatively impact the amenity of the surrounding area. Amenity is defined as the pleasantness or attractiveness of an area. The amenity of an area can be negatively impacted by: 

  • unacceptable levels of patron noise, including music 
  • parking problems 
  • excessive traffic – hoon behaviour 
  • nuisance or vandalism 
  • build-up of rubbish 
  • indecent or offensive behaviour 
  • drunkenness on the street. 

You have a legal responsibility to ensure the operation of your licence does not detract from the amenity of the area.
 

Administration

Red-line plans: You must keep a copy of the last red-line plan that was submitted for our approval. This must be made available at any time by any of your staff (not just your venue manager) if requested by one of our Inspectors.

Directors and nominees: You must notify us in writing if one of your approved directors or nominees ceases to have that role within 14 days of the change. We must approve any person before they can become a director of a company holding a liquor licence or before anyone can be appointed as a nominee. Nominees also must complete the New entrant training program prior to being appointed. 

Sub-letting your premises: You must not let or sub-let any part of the premises without our consent. 

Supply of alcohol by non-employees: You must not allow anyone that is not employed by you to carry on a business of supplying alcohol on the licensed premises without our consent. 

Change of associates: You must advise us of any changes to your associates within 14 days of the change. An associate is anyone who has significant influence in any of your alcohol-related businesses. This influence might be in how the business is managed or it might be a purely financial interest. If in doubt as to whether someone is an associate you should include them.
 

Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA)

RSA training is mandatory for licensees and a refresher course needs to be completed every three years. RSA program covers a range of topics including alcohol and the law, handling difficult customers, and problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. For more information see:  Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA)

Any time that alcohol is available at your venue you should consider having some type of food available. It can be free or available for people to buy. It can be as simple as nuts or chips.

It is against the law to supply alcohol to a person who is intoxicated.

A person is intoxicated if you believe their speech, balance, coordination or behaviour is noticeably affected by alcohol. If they’re intoxicated, they are allowed to stay on your premises but you must not serve them any more alcohol. For more information see: Intoxication guidelines 

Under 18 patrons on licensed premises

Anyone under the age of 18 years is considered a minor. It's illegal for any person to supply alcohol to a minor on licensed premises. It's also illegal for a minor to be on licensed premises to purchase, receive or consume alcohol. 
Minors cannot be on licensed premises unless there is a condition allowing them to on the licence. The other circumstances that allows minors to be on licensed premises are if the minor is: 

  • in the company of a responsible adult, or
  • having a meal, or
  • is a resident of the premises if accommodation is supplied, or
  • employed by the licensee but not involved in the supply of alcohol, or
  • completing a VCGLR approved training program in hospitality.

A responsible adult is defined as a person who is 18 years or older and is:

  • the minor's parent, step-parent, guardian, grandparent, or
  • the minor's spouse who is over the age of 18 years, or
  • a person who is acting in place of a parent and who could reasonably be expected to exercise responsible supervision of the minor – for example, a sporting coach.

 Minors cannot be involved in the supply of alcohol. 
 

Free drinking water

You are required to make suitable free drinking water available to patrons on licensed premises where alcohol is consumed on-site. The law does not specify how the water is to be provided. This is up to your own discretion. 

Wholesale data reporting

As the holder of a producer’s licence, you may be required to collect and report information about your annual wholesale alcohol transactions. For more information, see: Wholesale Data

Fire safety

Fire safety inspectors from the Metropolitan Fire Brigade or the Country Fire Authority have the power to enter licensed premises, without notice, to inspect for serious fire threats. If a serious fire threat is discovered, the fire safety inspector will advise us, and we have the power to immediately evacuate and close the licensed premises. If this occurs, your premises must not re-open until a fire safety inspector has declared it safe and we have revoked the closure and evacuation order.

Compliance with your obligations

Our inspectors ensure that people who are licensed to sell alcohol meet their obligations under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998, including any conditions of their specific licence. They can issue warnings, infringement notices (fines) or recommend disciplinary action for licensees who fail to comply.

They cover the state of Victoria 24-hours a day, seven days a week and can visit licensed premises any time they are open for business or by prior arrangement.  

Fore more information on what to expect during an inspection, watch our Be inspection ready videos.

Page last modified 
20 November 2019